A Moment of Sympathy for Boehner

When your enemy has reached the point where, for whatever reason, they can do you no more harm, any sympathy you might have for their travails emerges.

I’ve thought John Boehner was a posing, lying, self-serving jerk since I first saw him at work as speaker of the house. For four years, he has relentlessly trash-talked the president, worked against everything the Obama administration wanted to accomplish (regardless of whether or not it was a good idea), and devoted his utmost to making sure the rich got rich while the poor got nothing. He has been, for all that time, the perfect Republican.

Today, with his announced resignation–universally attributed to effective maneuvering by the minority fraction of his own party that is dominated by the professionally ignorant far right–we learn a bit about what it must have been like to be John Boehner for the last four years. In a word, I would guess what he feels is, “unappreciated.” Virginia’s Ken Cuccinelli, now president of the Senate Conservatives Fund, issued this jaw-dropping statement:

As Speaker of the House, John Boehner was hostile towards conservatives and our principles. Rather than fighting President Obama and his liberal policies, Speaker Boehner embraced them and betrayed his party’s own voters.

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One can only imagine Boehner reading this, and wondering if Cooch is smoking dope. “Embraced” the president’s policies? I missed those policies. Which ones were they?

Boehner’s departure has implications. First, it has already set off a fight over who will replace him. Imagine Dave LaRock as the next speaker and you’re probably picturing what the fight is all about as of today. Second, it means Boehner must have realized his “cut it in reconciliation” trick for defunding Planned Parenthood wasn’t going to work. That means there will be a government shut-down (something Cooch’s crew helped bring about last time, and will probably eagerly encourage again). Third, it means the Tea Party faction has (by the luck of numbers small enough to be a minority, but big enough to be necessary to outvoting the Democratic caucus) taken control of the United States congress. Ted Cruz loves the Senate Conservatives Fund, and is probably already looking around to see whom in his part of the legislature, this is going to spill over onto next

With all this vitriol, schadenfreude, and blood-lust in the air, I have to admit I do feel, just a teeny, tiny bit, some sympathy for John Boehner. He tried his best to ruin every effort made by Barack Obama. He couldn’t do it, but he tried his best. And now, when he’s being forced from power largely because of that failure, his critics claim he didn’t even try. That he “embraced” what he tried his best to destroy. Man, that’s gotta hurt.

John, I’ll never vote for you, nor send you a donation. But, if you’re in town, let me know. First round’s on me.

 

Bill Bolling To America: You’re Welcome

Burger Bill Bolling
“Burger” Bill Bolling

Bill Bolling, chairman of the Victory’s Thousand Fathers Project, holds no elected office, slunk away from his last primary contest, refused to support the statewide party ticket and would be considered unwelcome by many Virginia Republicans were he to publicly self-identify with the GOP. But none of that stops Bolling from attempting to ride the crest of last week’s Republican wave.

Best known for a hamburger picnic, and banking on extremely short memories in the Commonwealth, Bolling held forth yesterday in the Times-Dispatch to say, in essence: “See, I told you.”

While Bolling’s argument – that Ed Gillespie’s close finish proves Virginia Republicans should nominate people more like Bolling – conveniently overlooks whatever lesson we might draw from Ken Cuccinelli’s similarly close finish, it’s safe to assume we haven’t heard the last from Bolling … whenever a newspaper has space to fill, or a Democrat needs to strike a “bipartisan” pose, or someone, somewhere, is running low on condiments.